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IWCTS 2014 Technical Program Online

IWCTS 2014 Technical Program is online. Like previous years we have an exciting program this year. We have one keynote and 11 presentations. Check it out the program here!

IWCTS 2014 CFP Online

IWCTS 2014 CFP is online. This year IWCTS will be held in Dallas, Texas on November 4th 2014. Paper submission deadline is September 12nd 2014. Hope to see you there!!

Dagstuhl CTS Seminar 2013

Dagstuhl Seminar on Social Issues in Computational Transportation Science

December 15~19 2013, twenty-seven researchers gathered together at the Dagstuhl - Leibniz Centre for Informaitcs participating in the second Dagstuhl seminar on Computational Transportation Science. In this seminar we focused on the social computing aspect of CTS. Focusing on social computing was influenced by the many recent developments in social networks and crowd-sourcing for transportation as well as the integration of persuasive technologies, behavioral economics in social computing. The researchers and practitioners reviewed the developments in this direction, discuss issues and solutions, and plan joint publications on CTS from the social computing perspective.

Here is a glance of the schedule.

More information regarding the seminar can be found here: Link to the Dagstuhl Seminar Page


IWCTS 2014 CFP Online

IWCTS 2014 CFP is online. This year IWCTS will be held in Dallas, Texas on November 4th 2014. Paper submission deadline is September 12nd 2014. Hope to see you there!!

IWCTS 2013 was a success

IWCTS 2013 was held on November 5th 2013 in Orlando as part of the ACM SIGSPATIAL 2013. We received 21 paper submissions, and accepted 14 papers. You can find the technical programme here.

What is Computational Transportation Science?

In the near future, vehicles, travelers, and the infrastructure will collectively have billions of sensors that can communicate with each other. This environment will enable numerous novel applications and order of magnitude improvement in the performance of existing applications. However, information technology (IT) has not had the dramatic impact on day-to-day transportation that it has had on other domains such as business and science. In terms of the real-time information available to most travelers, with the exception of car navigation systems, the transportation experience has not changed much in the last 30-40 years. During this same time, the miniaturization of computing devices and advances in wireless communication and sensor technology have been propagating computing from the stationary desktop to the mobile outdoors, and making it ubiquitous. Transportation systems, due to their distributed/mobile nature, can become the ultimate test-bed for this ubiquitous (i.e., embedded, highly-distributed, and sensor-laden) computing environment of unprecedented scale. Information technology is the foundation for implementing new strategies, particularly if they are to be made available in real-time to wireless devices such as cell phones and PDAs. A related development is the emergence of increasingly more sophisticated geospatial and spatio-temporal information management capabilities. These factors have the potential to revolutionize traveler services, and the provision and analysis of related information. In this revolution, travelers and sensors in the infrastructure and in vehicles will all produce a vast amount of data that could be interpreted and acted upon to produce a sea change in transportation.

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